timdavie2022-1250x500.jpg

BBC boss Tim Davie talks about an internet-centric future with fewer TV channels and radio stations

Business News Media

By | Published on Thursday 8 December 2022

Tim Davie

The boss of the BBC, Tim Davie, yesterday said that the broadcaster needs to prepare for a future where most content is consumed over the internet and, as a result, operating lots of standalone channels and stations – as is the norm with traditional TV and radio broadcasts – won’t make any sense anymore.

There is usually a flurry of criticism and complaints whenever the BBC proposes to close down a channel – or take a broadcast service online only – and the concerns raised by the critics and complainers are usually valid.

Although, at the same time, the BBC has to find considerable cost savings as a result of its most recent licence fee settlement with the UK government; it needs to prepare for a future where the licence fee will probably be phased out completely; and it’s very aware that many younger consumers are simply not interacting with traditional broadcast channels.

In his speech for the Royal Television Society yesterday, Davie ran through some of the BBC’s key achievements over the last 100 years, including its current successes in terms of reach, influence and output. However, he explained, the media sector is changing rapidly and the BBC needs to move fast to keep up.

“Industry analysts predict that we have probably seen the last year in the UK when broadcasters make up the majority of video viewing”, Davie noted in his speech. “Five years ago broadcast TV reached nearly 80% of young adults a week. Today it’s around 50% and radical changes are happening across all ages. TikTok is now bigger than the BBC in video for 16-24s in the UK”.

“Imagine a world that is internet only”, he then mused, “where broadcast TV and radio are being switched off and choice is infinite. There’s still a lot of live linear viewing but it is all been delivered online … Could we harness the possibilities of this interactive digital landscape to increase public value and stimulate the UK media market? What would it actually take to deliver that?”

He then posed four questions: “Should we, as the UK, own a move to an internet future with greater urgency? Should we transform the BBC faster to have a clear, market leading role in the digital age? Should we proactively invest in the BBC brand as a global leader? Should we move faster in regulating for future success?”

The answer to all those questions, he argued, is a big fat “yes”.

“A switch off of broadcast will and should happen over time, and we should be active in planning for it”, he reckoned. Though for the BBC to embrace a shift to internet-only, “we must work together to ensure that everyone is connected, and can get their TV and radio via the internet. This isn’t something to resist. A fully connected UK has very significant benefits for society and our economy. It would unleash huge opportunities for innovation”.

And as the BBC’s services are increasingly online, “we will have fewer brands overall and consolidate more activity behind a simple, single brand in the UK: the BBC. And you’ll see this globally as well. We will also simplify sub-brands such as BBC News. You can see a first step in our bringing together of the BBC News Channel and BBC World News as one brand: BBC News”.

None of this is going to happen overnight, with Davie talking quite a bit about how things might look by 2030. But his main point was that the BBC needs to get ahead of the game in what he sees as an inevitable (and already happening) shift in media consumption, so that a public service broadcaster like the BBC, and the UK media industry at large, can still compete, in the UK and beyond.

“Digital offers a huge opportunity to unlock more audience value”, Davie went on, “but it requires big organisational change: a radical overhaul of how we use data, a heavyweight world-class tech team, new operating models, new creative solutions and ideas”.

“Imagine news reimagined for the iPlayer or increased functionality when watching the game online. We will be world-leading pioneers in this. No one in the world has created a digitally led public service media company of scale and the global opportunity for us is there for the taking”.

While partly preparing BBC audiences and employees for the bold changes ahead, there were also some obvious messages for government too in Davie’s speech. That’s partly about the funding of the Corporation, in both the short and longer term, but also about regulation, of the BBC itself, and even more importantly of the media and internet more widely.

You can read Davie’s full speech here.



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BidenHonorsPRRadio-Station.jpg

White House congratulates WKAQ’s contributions to Puerto Rican radio broadcasting at 100 years

A local Puerto Rican radio station received an unexpected letter this week from the Biden administration, congratulating it for its on-air contributions on its centennial anniversary. 

“I offer my congratulations to WKAQ 580 as you celebrate your 100th anniversary,” the president’s letter began. 

WKAQ 580 is Puerto Rico’s leading radio station that provides an expansive range of coverage, from hard-hitting breaking news to emergency and natural disasters, while maintaining a firm grip on cogent cultural issues. 

“For 100 years, WKAQ 580 has served as a trusted source of news and entertainment for listeners across Puerto Rico,” the letter read. 

The station, currently belonging to Univisión and poised for acquisition by Hemisphere Media Group, airs 24-hour programming through all of Puerto Rico’s coastal, mountainous, and metropolitan regions. 

On the island, celebrations commemorating WKAQ’s historic anniversary began in May, the month of radio, ahead of marking its centennial birthday in December. 

“Remembering its history, or at least making people remember is the best contribution we can give,” Joel Lago, the station’s general manager, told El Nuevo Día, hoping to revive the station’s memory. 

“The centenary is a good opportunity to do it, and for people not to forget how WKAQ started, and where we’re headed,” he continued. 

On Dec. 3, 1922, Joaquín Agusty delivered the very first radio wave from a space in San Juan, the island’s capital, after finagling with coils and cables from his apartment, a frequent and fervent pastime of his. 

“This is WKAQ, in San Juan, capital of Puerto Rico, where the best coffee is produced,” was Agusty’s opener and the first words uttered into the island’s broadcasting history, and they continue today. 

With Agusty’s introduction into a transmitter, San Juan became the birthplace of massive communications operations, one of three at the time — including the U.S. and Cuba — before radio underwent a continental expansion into Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.

WKAQ primarily aired entertainment in the form of theater and music, thereby inducting a slate of permanent cultural powerhouses like José Luis Torregrosa, who shaped the first scriptwriting format for Puerto Rican radio, and who authored the first textbook that captured its history. 

“From keeping Puerto Ricans informed with day-to-day news and providing emergency updates during natural disasters to celebrating exciting developments in sports and music, your station has helped keep listeners engaged with their community,” the White House’s letter underlined. 

Listeners in the 30s, 40s and 50s enjoyed long-form programming that included original dramatic works, in addition to classics like Tarzan, where the heroic adventurer’s howl reverberated in Puerto Rican homes. 

Over time, though, as media consumption changed in Puerto Rico in the 70s, so did transmission at WKAQ. 

The station altered the way Puerto Ricans consumed political news by introducing political analysis segments into its news programming, a format that has endured the test of time and is still true to this day. 

WKAQ, beyond serving its communications duty, is an encyclopedia. It has, for decades, recorded pivotal moments in history for its audience — including JFK’s assassination — becoming the framework for breaking news broadcasting on the island. 

But WKAQ also had a permeating effect on the industry’s talent. It forged a class of locutores (radio show hosts) who cultivated intimate albeit far-reaching relationships with families who tuned into their shows and whose names defined a generation of listeners. 

WKAQ also shaped news reporting and generated a talent pipeline of Puerto Rican journalists who, to this day, helm nationwide breaking news coverage on the island.

One such name is Luis Francisco Ojeda, a Puerto Rican newscaster and the first radio news reporter who routinely brought political figures to task, on some occasions resulting in shouting matches on his late show, Ojeda Sin Limite (Ojeda Without Limit).

“On this centennial anniversary, I hope you are proud of the enduring impact WKAQ 580 has had in the Puerto Rican community and on the lives of all your listeners,” the letter, signed by President Joe Biden, concludes. 




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timdavie2022-1250x500.jpg

BBC boss Tim Davie talks about an internet-centric future with fewer TV channels and radio stations

Business News Media

By | Published on Thursday 8 December 2022

Tim Davie

The boss of the BBC, Tim Davie, yesterday said that the broadcaster needs to prepare for a future where most content is consumed over the internet and, as a result, operating lots of standalone channels and stations – as is the norm with traditional TV and radio broadcasts – won’t make any sense anymore.

There is usually a flurry of criticism and complaints whenever the BBC proposes to close down a channel – or take a broadcast service online only – and the concerns raised by the critics and complainers are usually valid.

Although, at the same time, the BBC has to find considerable cost savings as a result of its most recent licence fee settlement with the UK government; it needs to prepare for a future where the licence fee will probably be phased out completely; and it’s very aware that many younger consumers are simply not interacting with traditional broadcast channels.

In his speech for the Royal Television Society yesterday, Davie ran through some of the BBC’s key achievements over the last 100 years, including its current successes in terms of reach, influence and output. However, he explained, the media sector is changing rapidly and the BBC needs to move fast to keep up.

“Industry analysts predict that we have probably seen the last year in the UK when broadcasters make up the majority of video viewing”, Davie noted in his speech. “Five years ago broadcast TV reached nearly 80% of young adults a week. Today it’s around 50% and radical changes are happening across all ages. TikTok is now bigger than the BBC in video for 16-24s in the UK”.

“Imagine a world that is internet only”, he then mused, “where broadcast TV and radio are being switched off and choice is infinite. There’s still a lot of live linear viewing but it is all been delivered online … Could we harness the possibilities of this interactive digital landscape to increase public value and stimulate the UK media market? What would it actually take to deliver that?”

He then posed four questions: “Should we, as the UK, own a move to an internet future with greater urgency? Should we transform the BBC faster to have a clear, market leading role in the digital age? Should we proactively invest in the BBC brand as a global leader? Should we move faster in regulating for future success?”

The answer to all those questions, he argued, is a big fat “yes”.

“A switch off of broadcast will and should happen over time, and we should be active in planning for it”, he reckoned. Though for the BBC to embrace a shift to internet-only, “we must work together to ensure that everyone is connected, and can get their TV and radio via the internet. This isn’t something to resist. A fully connected UK has very significant benefits for society and our economy. It would unleash huge opportunities for innovation”.

And as the BBC’s services are increasingly online, “we will have fewer brands overall and consolidate more activity behind a simple, single brand in the UK: the BBC. And you’ll see this globally as well. We will also simplify sub-brands such as BBC News. You can see a first step in our bringing together of the BBC News Channel and BBC World News as one brand: BBC News”.

None of this is going to happen overnight, with Davie talking quite a bit about how things might look by 2030. But his main point was that the BBC needs to get ahead of the game in what he sees as an inevitable (and already happening) shift in media consumption, so that a public service broadcaster like the BBC, and the UK media industry at large, can still compete, in the UK and beyond.

“Digital offers a huge opportunity to unlock more audience value”, Davie went on, “but it requires big organisational change: a radical overhaul of how we use data, a heavyweight world-class tech team, new operating models, new creative solutions and ideas”.

“Imagine news reimagined for the iPlayer or increased functionality when watching the game online. We will be world-leading pioneers in this. No one in the world has created a digitally led public service media company of scale and the global opportunity for us is there for the taking”.

While partly preparing BBC audiences and employees for the bold changes ahead, there were also some obvious messages for government too in Davie’s speech. That’s partly about the funding of the Corporation, in both the short and longer term, but also about regulation, of the BBC itself, and even more importantly of the media and internet more widely.

You can read Davie’s full speech here.



READ MORE ABOUT: |



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65341169-11512689-image-a-1_1670425616429.jpg

BBC could turn OFF its TV and radio channels within a decade: Corporation plan for online future

The BBC could turn off its terrestrial radio and TV services within the next decade, the corporation’s director general has indicated.

Tim Davie said a ‘switch off of broadcast will and should happen over time’ and that the BBC should be ‘active in planning for it’.

He said the corporation needed to ‘own a move to an internet future’ with ‘greater urgency’ as he looked towards 2030 and beyond.

In a speech to the Royal Television Society he said: ‘Imagine a world that is internet only, where broadcast TV and radio are being switched off and choice is infinite.

‘There’s still a lot of live linear viewing but it is all been delivered online.’

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for 'serious public service investment' if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years 

He suggested there is a ‘bad way [the switch off] could happen’ where access to the BBC is no longer universal or ‘unaffordable for too many’.

‘Where the gateway to content is owned by well capitalised overseas companies,’ he added.

In order to avoid this the country must ‘close gaps and guarantee accessibility for all,’ he said, describing efforts by the Government to improve access to fixed-line broadband and 5G or 4G as ‘critical’.

The director-general also called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years.

Mr Davie said that the BBC needs more money to support the World Service and ‘avoid further cuts’.

Some 382 jobs at the service, often regarded as a source of soft power for the UK, are being lost as part of plans to move to a digital-led offering, with the Arabic and Persian radio services among those closing.

He said he plans to discuss the issue with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and warned that Russia and China are ‘investing hundreds of millions in state backed services’.

‘We have a choice to make,’ he added.

The BBC has said that due to a freeze in the licence fee and inflation it faces a £400 million funding gap by 2026/2027 and must make savings.

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’.

‘The threat is not about if there is choice, it is about the scope of future choice and what factors shape it,’ he added.

During the speech, Mr Davie described a blueprint for what the media market of the next decade could look like.

He said: ‘As we look to the 2030s, we are open minded about future funding mechanics.

‘But we are clear that it is critical that we need a universal solution that fuels UK public service growth not stifles it while offering audiences outstanding value for money.

‘Of course, the latest settlement did include the increased debt facility for BBC Studios which was welcome, and we are ambitious about its prospects.

‘Alongside commercial plans, we will keep cutting costs to invest and attract more partner investment as well such as the latest deal we announced with Disney on Doctor Who.

Mr Davie said UK media are in 'a period of real jeopardy' with a 'life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide'

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’

‘But under the most ambitious scenarios, this will not change the need for serious public service investment.’

Earlier this year, former Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries announced the licence fee would be frozen at £159 for the next two years until April 2024.

She said she wanted to find a new funding model before the current deal expires in 2027 as it is ‘completely outdated’.

The new minister, Michelle Donelan, said this week it is ‘impossible’ to sustain the BBC on the current licence fee model, confirming she plans to continue the Government’s review into the annual charge.

Mr Davie said the BBC, politicians, regulators and the wider industry must work together to ‘leave a legacy of a thriving, world leading UK media market or accept, on our watch, a slow decline’.


Source link

BidenHonorsPRRadio-Station.jpg

White House congratulates WKAQ’s contributions to Puerto Rican radio broadcasting at 100 years

A local Puerto Rican radio station received an unexpected letter this week from the Biden administration, congratulating it for its on-air contributions on its centennial anniversary. 

“I offer my congratulations to WKAQ 580 as you celebrate your 100th anniversary,” the president’s letter began. 

WKAQ 580 is Puerto Rico’s leading radio station that provides an expansive range of coverage, from hard-hitting breaking news to emergency and natural disasters, while maintaining a firm grip on cogent cultural issues. 

“For 100 years, WKAQ 580 has served as a trusted source of news and entertainment for listeners across Puerto Rico,” the letter read. 

The station, currently belonging to Univisión and poised for acquisition by Hemisphere Media Group, airs 24-hour programming through all of Puerto Rico’s coastal, mountainous, and metropolitan regions. 

On the island, celebrations commemorating WKAQ’s historic anniversary began in May, the month of radio, ahead of marking its centennial birthday in December. 

“Remembering its history, or at least making people remember is the best contribution we can give,” Joel Lago, the station’s general manager, told El Nuevo Día, hoping to revive the station’s memory. 

“The centenary is a good opportunity to do it, and for people not to forget how WKAQ started, and where we’re headed,” he continued. 

On Dec. 3, 1922, Joaquín Agusty delivered the very first radio wave from a space in San Juan, the island’s capital, after finagling with coils and cables from his apartment, a frequent and fervent pastime of his. 

“This is WKAQ, in San Juan, capital of Puerto Rico, where the best coffee is produced,” was Agusty’s opener and the first words uttered into the island’s broadcasting history, and they continue today. 

With Agusty’s introduction into a transmitter, San Juan became the birthplace of massive communications operations, one of three at the time — including the U.S. and Cuba — before radio underwent a continental expansion into Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.

WKAQ primarily aired entertainment in the form of theater and music, thereby inducting a slate of permanent cultural powerhouses like José Luis Torregrosa, who shaped the first scriptwriting format for Puerto Rican radio, and who authored the first textbook that captured its history. 

“From keeping Puerto Ricans informed with day-to-day news and providing emergency updates during natural disasters to celebrating exciting developments in sports and music, your station has helped keep listeners engaged with their community,” the White House’s letter underlined. 

Listeners in the 30s, 40s and 50s enjoyed long-form programming that included original dramatic works, in addition to classics like Tarzan, where the heroic adventurer’s howl reverberated in Puerto Rican homes. 

Over time, though, as media consumption changed in Puerto Rico in the 70s, so did transmission at WKAQ. 

The station altered the way Puerto Ricans consumed political news by introducing political analysis segments into its news programming, a format that has endured the test of time and is still true to this day. 

WKAQ, beyond serving its communications duty, is an encyclopedia. It has, for decades, recorded pivotal moments in history for its audience — including JFK’s assassination — becoming the framework for breaking news broadcasting on the island. 

But WKAQ also had a permeating effect on the industry’s talent. It forged a class of locutores (radio show hosts) who cultivated intimate albeit far-reaching relationships with families who tuned into their shows and whose names defined a generation of listeners. 

WKAQ also shaped news reporting and generated a talent pipeline of Puerto Rican journalists who, to this day, helm nationwide breaking news coverage on the island.

One such name is Luis Francisco Ojeda, a Puerto Rican newscaster and the first radio news reporter who routinely brought political figures to task, on some occasions resulting in shouting matches on his late show, Ojeda Sin Limite (Ojeda Without Limit).

“On this centennial anniversary, I hope you are proud of the enduring impact WKAQ 580 has had in the Puerto Rican community and on the lives of all your listeners,” the letter, signed by President Joe Biden, concludes. 




Source link

65341169-11512689-image-a-1_1670425616429.jpg

BBC could turn OFF its TV and radio channels within a decade: Corporation plan for online future

The BBC could turn off its terrestrial radio and TV services within the next decade, the corporation’s director general has indicated.

Tim Davie said a ‘switch off of broadcast will and should happen over time’ and that the BBC should be ‘active in planning for it’.

He said the corporation needed to ‘own a move to an internet future’ with ‘greater urgency’ as he looked towards 2030 and beyond.

In a speech to the Royal Television Society he said: ‘Imagine a world that is internet only, where broadcast TV and radio are being switched off and choice is infinite.

‘There’s still a lot of live linear viewing but it is all been delivered online.’

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for 'serious public service investment' if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years 

He suggested there is a ‘bad way [the switch off] could happen’ where access to the BBC is no longer universal or ‘unaffordable for too many’.

‘Where the gateway to content is owned by well capitalised overseas companies,’ he added.

In order to avoid this the country must ‘close gaps and guarantee accessibility for all,’ he said, describing efforts by the Government to improve access to fixed-line broadband and 5G or 4G as ‘critical’.

The director-general also called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years.

Mr Davie said that the BBC needs more money to support the World Service and ‘avoid further cuts’.

Some 382 jobs at the service, often regarded as a source of soft power for the UK, are being lost as part of plans to move to a digital-led offering, with the Arabic and Persian radio services among those closing.

He said he plans to discuss the issue with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and warned that Russia and China are ‘investing hundreds of millions in state backed services’.

‘We have a choice to make,’ he added.

The BBC has said that due to a freeze in the licence fee and inflation it faces a £400 million funding gap by 2026/2027 and must make savings.

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’.

‘The threat is not about if there is choice, it is about the scope of future choice and what factors shape it,’ he added.

During the speech, Mr Davie described a blueprint for what the media market of the next decade could look like.

He said: ‘As we look to the 2030s, we are open minded about future funding mechanics.

‘But we are clear that it is critical that we need a universal solution that fuels UK public service growth not stifles it while offering audiences outstanding value for money.

‘Of course, the latest settlement did include the increased debt facility for BBC Studios which was welcome, and we are ambitious about its prospects.

‘Alongside commercial plans, we will keep cutting costs to invest and attract more partner investment as well such as the latest deal we announced with Disney on Doctor Who.

Mr Davie said UK media are in 'a period of real jeopardy' with a 'life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide'

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’

‘But under the most ambitious scenarios, this will not change the need for serious public service investment.’

Earlier this year, former Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries announced the licence fee would be frozen at £159 for the next two years until April 2024.

She said she wanted to find a new funding model before the current deal expires in 2027 as it is ‘completely outdated’.

The new minister, Michelle Donelan, said this week it is ‘impossible’ to sustain the BBC on the current licence fee model, confirming she plans to continue the Government’s review into the annual charge.

Mr Davie said the BBC, politicians, regulators and the wider industry must work together to ‘leave a legacy of a thriving, world leading UK media market or accept, on our watch, a slow decline’.


Source link

BidenHonorsPRRadio-Station.jpg

White House congratulates WKAQ’s contributions to Puerto Rican radio broadcasting at 100 years

A local Puerto Rican radio station received an unexpected letter this week from the Biden administration, congratulating it for its on-air contributions on its centennial anniversary. 

“I offer my congratulations to WKAQ 580 as you celebrate your 100th anniversary,” the president’s letter began. 

WKAQ 580 is Puerto Rico’s leading radio station that provides an expansive range of coverage, from hard-hitting breaking news to emergency and natural disasters, while maintaining a firm grip on cogent cultural issues. 

“For 100 years, WKAQ 580 has served as a trusted source of news and entertainment for listeners across Puerto Rico,” the letter read. 

The station, currently belonging to Univisión and poised for acquisition by Hemisphere Media Group, airs 24-hour programming through all of Puerto Rico’s coastal, mountainous, and metropolitan regions. 

On the island, celebrations commemorating WKAQ’s historic anniversary began in May, the month of radio, ahead of marking its centennial birthday in December. 

“Remembering its history, or at least making people remember is the best contribution we can give,” Joel Lago, the station’s general manager, told El Nuevo Día, hoping to revive the station’s memory. 

“The centenary is a good opportunity to do it, and for people not to forget how WKAQ started, and where we’re headed,” he continued. 

On Dec. 3, 1922, Joaquín Agusty delivered the very first radio wave from a space in San Juan, the island’s capital, after finagling with coils and cables from his apartment, a frequent and fervent pastime of his. 

“This is WKAQ, in San Juan, capital of Puerto Rico, where the best coffee is produced,” was Agusty’s opener and the first words uttered into the island’s broadcasting history, and they continue today. 

With Agusty’s introduction into a transmitter, San Juan became the birthplace of massive communications operations, one of three at the time — including the U.S. and Cuba — before radio underwent a continental expansion into Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.

WKAQ primarily aired entertainment in the form of theater and music, thereby inducting a slate of permanent cultural powerhouses like José Luis Torregrosa, who shaped the first scriptwriting format for Puerto Rican radio, and who authored the first textbook that captured its history. 

“From keeping Puerto Ricans informed with day-to-day news and providing emergency updates during natural disasters to celebrating exciting developments in sports and music, your station has helped keep listeners engaged with their community,” the White House’s letter underlined. 

Listeners in the 30s, 40s and 50s enjoyed long-form programming that included original dramatic works, in addition to classics like Tarzan, where the heroic adventurer’s howl reverberated in Puerto Rican homes. 

Over time, though, as media consumption changed in Puerto Rico in the 70s, so did transmission at WKAQ. 

The station altered the way Puerto Ricans consumed political news by introducing political analysis segments into its news programming, a format that has endured the test of time and is still true to this day. 

WKAQ, beyond serving its communications duty, is an encyclopedia. It has, for decades, recorded pivotal moments in history for its audience — including JFK’s assassination — becoming the framework for breaking news broadcasting on the island. 

But WKAQ also had a permeating effect on the industry’s talent. It forged a class of locutores (radio show hosts) who cultivated intimate albeit far-reaching relationships with families who tuned into their shows and whose names defined a generation of listeners. 

WKAQ also shaped news reporting and generated a talent pipeline of Puerto Rican journalists who, to this day, helm nationwide breaking news coverage on the island.

One such name is Luis Francisco Ojeda, a Puerto Rican newscaster and the first radio news reporter who routinely brought political figures to task, on some occasions resulting in shouting matches on his late show, Ojeda Sin Limite (Ojeda Without Limit).

“On this centennial anniversary, I hope you are proud of the enduring impact WKAQ 580 has had in the Puerto Rican community and on the lives of all your listeners,” the letter, signed by President Joe Biden, concludes. 




Source link

65341169-11512689-image-a-1_1670425616429.jpg

BBC could turn OFF its TV and radio channels within a decade: Corporation plan for online future

The BBC could turn off its terrestrial radio and TV services within the next decade, the corporation’s director general has indicated.

Tim Davie said a ‘switch off of broadcast will and should happen over time’ and that the BBC should be ‘active in planning for it’.

He said the corporation needed to ‘own a move to an internet future’ with ‘greater urgency’ as he looked towards 2030 and beyond.

In a speech to the Royal Television Society he said: ‘Imagine a world that is internet only, where broadcast TV and radio are being switched off and choice is infinite.

‘There’s still a lot of live linear viewing but it is all been delivered online.’

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for 'serious public service investment' if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years 

He suggested there is a ‘bad way [the switch off] could happen’ where access to the BBC is no longer universal or ‘unaffordable for too many’.

‘Where the gateway to content is owned by well capitalised overseas companies,’ he added.

In order to avoid this the country must ‘close gaps and guarantee accessibility for all,’ he said, describing efforts by the Government to improve access to fixed-line broadband and 5G or 4G as ‘critical’.

The director-general also called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years.

Mr Davie said that the BBC needs more money to support the World Service and ‘avoid further cuts’.

Some 382 jobs at the service, often regarded as a source of soft power for the UK, are being lost as part of plans to move to a digital-led offering, with the Arabic and Persian radio services among those closing.

He said he plans to discuss the issue with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and warned that Russia and China are ‘investing hundreds of millions in state backed services’.

‘We have a choice to make,’ he added.

The BBC has said that due to a freeze in the licence fee and inflation it faces a £400 million funding gap by 2026/2027 and must make savings.

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’.

‘The threat is not about if there is choice, it is about the scope of future choice and what factors shape it,’ he added.

During the speech, Mr Davie described a blueprint for what the media market of the next decade could look like.

He said: ‘As we look to the 2030s, we are open minded about future funding mechanics.

‘But we are clear that it is critical that we need a universal solution that fuels UK public service growth not stifles it while offering audiences outstanding value for money.

‘Of course, the latest settlement did include the increased debt facility for BBC Studios which was welcome, and we are ambitious about its prospects.

‘Alongside commercial plans, we will keep cutting costs to invest and attract more partner investment as well such as the latest deal we announced with Disney on Doctor Who.

Mr Davie said UK media are in 'a period of real jeopardy' with a 'life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide'

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’

‘But under the most ambitious scenarios, this will not change the need for serious public service investment.’

Earlier this year, former Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries announced the licence fee would be frozen at £159 for the next two years until April 2024.

She said she wanted to find a new funding model before the current deal expires in 2027 as it is ‘completely outdated’.

The new minister, Michelle Donelan, said this week it is ‘impossible’ to sustain the BBC on the current licence fee model, confirming she plans to continue the Government’s review into the annual charge.

Mr Davie said the BBC, politicians, regulators and the wider industry must work together to ‘leave a legacy of a thriving, world leading UK media market or accept, on our watch, a slow decline’.


Source link

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BBC could turn OFF its TV and radio channels within a decade: Corporation plan for online future

The BBC could turn off its terrestrial radio and TV services within the next decade, the corporation’s director general has indicated.

Tim Davie said a ‘switch off of broadcast will and should happen over time’ and that the BBC should be ‘active in planning for it’.

He said the corporation needed to ‘own a move to an internet future’ with ‘greater urgency’ as he looked towards 2030 and beyond.

In a speech to the Royal Television Society he said: ‘Imagine a world that is internet only, where broadcast TV and radio are being switched off and choice is infinite.

‘There’s still a lot of live linear viewing but it is all been delivered online.’

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for 'serious public service investment' if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years

Tim Davie, director-general of the BBC, has called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years 

He suggested there is a ‘bad way [the switch off] could happen’ where access to the BBC is no longer universal or ‘unaffordable for too many’.

‘Where the gateway to content is owned by well capitalised overseas companies,’ he added.

In order to avoid this the country must ‘close gaps and guarantee accessibility for all,’ he said, describing efforts by the Government to improve access to fixed-line broadband and 5G or 4G as ‘critical’.

The director-general also called for ‘serious public service investment’ if it is to compete with international rivals in the coming years.

Mr Davie said that the BBC needs more money to support the World Service and ‘avoid further cuts’.

Some 382 jobs at the service, often regarded as a source of soft power for the UK, are being lost as part of plans to move to a digital-led offering, with the Arabic and Persian radio services among those closing.

He said he plans to discuss the issue with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and warned that Russia and China are ‘investing hundreds of millions in state backed services’.

‘We have a choice to make,’ he added.

The BBC has said that due to a freeze in the licence fee and inflation it faces a £400 million funding gap by 2026/2027 and must make savings.

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’.

‘The threat is not about if there is choice, it is about the scope of future choice and what factors shape it,’ he added.

During the speech, Mr Davie described a blueprint for what the media market of the next decade could look like.

He said: ‘As we look to the 2030s, we are open minded about future funding mechanics.

‘But we are clear that it is critical that we need a universal solution that fuels UK public service growth not stifles it while offering audiences outstanding value for money.

‘Of course, the latest settlement did include the increased debt facility for BBC Studios which was welcome, and we are ambitious about its prospects.

‘Alongside commercial plans, we will keep cutting costs to invest and attract more partner investment as well such as the latest deal we announced with Disney on Doctor Who.

Mr Davie said UK media are in 'a period of real jeopardy' with a 'life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide'

Mr Davie said UK media are in ‘a period of real jeopardy’ with a ‘life-threatening challenge to our local media and the cultural and the social benefit they provide’

‘But under the most ambitious scenarios, this will not change the need for serious public service investment.’

Earlier this year, former Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries announced the licence fee would be frozen at £159 for the next two years until April 2024.

She said she wanted to find a new funding model before the current deal expires in 2027 as it is ‘completely outdated’.

The new minister, Michelle Donelan, said this week it is ‘impossible’ to sustain the BBC on the current licence fee model, confirming she plans to continue the Government’s review into the annual charge.

Mr Davie said the BBC, politicians, regulators and the wider industry must work together to ‘leave a legacy of a thriving, world leading UK media market or accept, on our watch, a slow decline’.


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