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Netflix’s Spotify Origin Story ‘The Playlist’ Debuts in October

Netflix The Playlist Spotify Origin Story Photo Credit: Netflix

Netflix has released the first trailer for its fictional Spotify series called ‘The Playlist.’

The series appears to be taking some cues from The Social Network with a fictional account of Spotify founder Daniel Ek. The story follows Ek’s journey to transform music piracy into music streaming, helping to reshape the entire music industry.

‘The Playlist’ is a six-part miniseries that will debut on October 13 on Netflix. Netflix movie director Per-Olav Sørensen directed the project, while Christian Spurrier wrote the series. What the trailer doesn’t really explore is the aftermath of Spotify and how it impacts the bottom line for artists.

There’s very little talk of unpaid royalties or artists who aren’t happy with their share of the pie. It also takes some liberties with the reality of music streaming at the time. It paints Spotify as the service that revolutionized music streaming–but RealPlayer’s Rhapsody existed well before Spotify.

The two-minute trailer is set to the tune of Swedish DJ Avicii’s “Levels,” and shows Spotify’s early startup culture. According to Netflix, “it is a story about how hard convictions, unrelenting will, access and big dreams can help small players challenge the status quo by evolving the way we can all listen to music.”

‘The Playlist’ is inspired by the book Spotify Untold by Swedish business reporters Sven Carlsson and Johnas Leijohnhufvud. Edvin Endre stars as Daniel Ek, who invented Spotify in 2002 to rival peer-to-peer music sharing platforms like KaZaa and torrent sites like The Pirate Bay.

Endre is joined by Ulf Stenberg as Per Sundin, Gizem Erdogan as Petra Hansson, Joel Lützow as Andreas Ehn, Christian Hillborg as Martin Lorentzon, and Swedish artist Janice Kamya Kavander as Bobbie T.

“‘The Playlist’ is at its very core a story about music,” says director Per-Olav Sørensen. “Portraying in fiction how Spotify changed the music industry is impossible without the perspective of the artists, and our character Bobbie T is representing their voices in this story.”


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Hope St Radio x Paramount House Hotel, Sydney

Cult Melbourne internet radio station and wine bar Hope St Radio is coming to Sydney, taking over Paramount House Hotel with a two-day residency. The pop-up will bring together the bar’s produce-driven eats, natural wine and impeccable music curation across a series of three events.

On Thursday, October 20, the pop-up will kick off with a dinner party in the Paramount Coffee Project space featuring food from Chef Ellie Bouhadana, wine pairings from Jack Shaw and music from Tangela and Bobby Vibe Positive.

The following day, the party continues with two more events. The first is a pop-up bar from Bouhadana in the Paramount House lobby. This one-night-only event, titled Ellie’s Crostini Bar, will feature a curated selection of some of Bouhadana and the Hope St team’s favourite wines, alongside next-level bar snacks and a DJ set from Ivy. Kicking off at 6pm, entry to the bar is free with no bookings available, so show up early to nab a spot.

The festivities will continue at the Golden Age Cinema and Bar underneath the hotel. This official free after party will feature an appearance from Gunai/Kurnai and Yorta Yorta artist, DJ and producer DJ Pgz who has been making huge waves in the Sydney club scene, as well as a back-to-back DJ set from C.Fim and Mirasia. Accompanying the electronic tunes will be a film from local musicians Sam Miers and E Fishpool which will play on loop throughout the night.

Hope St Radio, Tom Blachford




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Fox Weatherman Bryan Norcross Breaks The Internet Drawing “Hurricane Ian’s D*ck” On Live TV

Bryan Norcross is a meteorologist, most known for his coverage of hurricanes, including the coverage of Hurricane Andrew some 30 years ago.

And this week, Norcross is having to weather a new kind of storm.  

On Sunday, Norcross was a guest on Fox Weather for a live broadcast discussing Hurricane Ian’s path and its potential consequences, when he made an unfortunate visual representation. The cone-shaped line he drew down the spine of central Florida resembled what some people saw as a phallic-shaped drawing. 

The well-known presenter referring to the incoming storm’s path:

“That’s daunting.”

A hurricane dick? Daunting indeed…

It caused quite the stir on social media with many calling him out, including radio host Nicole Sandler, who tweeted:

“Bryan Norcross was the weather guy who got us through Hurricane Andrew 30 years ago. Now with Fox weather, he’s drawing Ian d*** on the tv.” 

Another Twitter user made a compilation of Norcross commentary and visual representations and captioned his post saying:

“This guy has been doing this ALL DAY LONG”

The commentary made by the reporter was continuously taken out of context throughout the day:

 “Look at this! What you think you see are all kind of tracks here over Florida.” 

A commenter on Twitter put in frankly:  

“Bryan Norcross let everyone know Hurricane Ian is screwing Florida.” 

Now back to you, Dick. 


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Quebec election, Sept. 28: PQ leader defends candidates’ comments on Islam, racial profiling

Opponents slam François Legault for saying a hike in immigration would be ‘suicidal’ for Quebec. CAQ candidate apologizes for suggesting 80% of immigrants “don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values.”

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Updated throughout the day on Wednesday, Sept. 28. Questions/comments: ariga@postmedia.com

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Top updates

  • ‘No matter where you come from, you are a Quebecer,’ Nadeau-Dubois says
  • CAQ is ‘inventing an immigration crisis,’ Anglade says
  • ‘Dangerous’; ‘pathetic’: Legault, Boulet blasted for immigration comments
  • In first book, Toula Drimonis looks at belonging in Quebec
  • Quebec’s ‘post-COVID’ election campaign has few mentions of deaths, emergency powers
  • Opinion: It’s vital that English-speaking Quebecers’ voices be heard
  • PQ leader defends candidates’ comments on Islam, racial profiling
  • Only 7% of French-speaking Quebecers think language rights are an issue, poll suggests
  • For elections and asteroids alike, Philippe Fournier has our numbers
  • Boulet should be turfed immediately, Bloc Montréal says
  • Legault says Boulet would not return as immigration minister
  • Responding to Boulet, Plante says immigrants contribute to Montreal’s ‘economic, social and cultural vitality and to the dynamism of French’
  • ‘Pathetic’ – Duhaime criticizes immigration comments by Legault and Boulet
  • Liberals are the only party that consistently ‘values the contribution of all Quebecers,’ Anglade says
  • Aislin’s take
  • Liberal denounces Boulet’s ‘prejudiced’ comments on immigration
  • ‘Hurtful, rude and irresponsible’ – Nadeau-Dubois slams Legault on immigration
  • Quebecers are less than impressed with all party leaders, poll suggests
  • Accepting more than 50,000 immigrants annually would be ‘a bit suicidal’ for Quebec, Legault says
  • 80% of immigrants ‘don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values,’ CAQ minister says
  • PQ candidate ‘retracts certain comments’ after report on her anti-Islam statements
  • CAQ could win fewer votes but 15 more seats than in massive 2018 victory, projections suggest
  • CAQ worker highlights ‘misogynist and violent’ lyrics in TikTok video featuring Nadeau-Dubois and Massé
  • Anglade’s daughter wasn’t too impressed with mom’s ’embarrassing’ dance on debate night
  • Election Guide: What you need to know about the campaign and voting
  • Sign up for our free Quebec election newsletter

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4:15 p.m.

Thanks for reading

That’s it for today.

I’ll be back tomorrow morning with another live blog.

In the meantime, you can read our election coverage at montrealgazette.com.


4 p.m.

‘No matter where you come from, you are a Quebecer,’ Nadeau-Dubois says

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois says Quebec deserves a leader who brings Quebecers together.

The Québec solidaire co-spokesperson was reacting to Coalition Avenir Québec Leader François Legault’s latest comments about immigration.

Said Nadeau-Dubois: “In Quebec, we need a leader who brings people together – look at what’s happening in other parts of the world, the conflicts, the tension.

“It seems to me that in Quebec, we deserve to be led by someone who brings Quebecers together, who says that no matter where you come from, no matter what your religion is, no matter the colour of your skin, no matter how your name sounds, you are a Quebecer.”

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3:55 p.m.

CAQ is ‘inventing an immigration crisis,’ Anglade says

“By inventing an immigration crisis, the Coalition Avenir Québec is hiding from the real issues that affect Quebecers, such as the economy and labour shortages,” the Liberals said in a Facebook post this afternoon.

“For the CAQ, immigration is a problem; for the Liberal Party of Quebec, it is an asset and opportunity for all of Quebec. The history of Quebec was built by Quebecers of all backgrounds and it will continue to be.”

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3:50 p.m.

‘Dangerous’; ‘pathetic’: Legault, Boulet blasted for immigration comments

Following up on my live reporting earlier, here’s our full story about today’s immigration controversies.

Saying a hike in immigration would be “suicidal” for Quebec or that most immigrants don’t work sows fear, opposition leaders charge.

Coalition Avenir Québec minister Jean Boulet responds to the opposition during question period at the legislature in Quebec City, Thursday, May 12, 2022.
Coalition Avenir Québec minister Jean Boulet responds to the opposition during question period at the legislature in Quebec City, Thursday, May 12, 2022. Photo by Jacques Boissinot /The Canadian Press files

3:25 p.m.

In first book, Toula Drimonis looks at belonging in Quebec

The timing couldn’t be better, really. With the Quebec election campaign in the homestretch, with Coalition Avenir Québec Leader François Legault linking immigrants to extremism and violence (he has since backtracked), Toula Drimonis offers a view from the other side.

The journalist and socio-political commentator’s first book, We, the Others: Allophones, Immigrants and Belonging in Canada, was released last week by Linda Leith Publishing. Mixing personal and family history with a researched and critical overview of federal and provincial responses to immigration over the years, it’s an insider’s look at the immigrant experience and life as an allophone in Quebec. Hint: It’s not always easy.

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Read our full story, by T’Cha Dunlevy.

“As an allophone, I often feel like I’m sitting on the sidelines,” says journalist and socio-political commentator Toula Drimonis.
“As an allophone, I often feel like I’m sitting on the sidelines,” says journalist and socio-political commentator Toula Drimonis. Photo by John Kenney /Montreal Gazette

3 p.m.

Quebec’s ‘post-COVID’ election campaign has few mentions of deaths, emergency powers

From The Canadian Press:

The French phrase “bain de foule” appears regularly on the agendas of Quebec’s major party leaders during the provincial election campaign.

The term, which directly translates into English as “crowd bath,” is used to describe walkabouts at public places such as markets, regional fairs and busy commercial streets, during which politicians shake voters’ hands, pose for photos and occasionally hold babies.

Politicians bathing in crowds is a sign of the post-pandemic atmosphere of Quebec’s election campaign: masks are rare, candidates are up close with supporters and political rallies are back.

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“We are in a completely post-COVID campaign,” Eric Montpetit, a political science professor at Université de Montréal, said in an interview Tuesday.

Quebec’s campaign, which ends election day Oct. 3, is in stark contrast to campaigns conducted during the pandemic in other provinces, such as New Brunswick in 2020, where there were no rallies and where some parties stopped campaigning door-to-door. In Ontario’s spring election, candidates wore masks and the leaders of both the NDP and Green Party were forced to pause their campaigns after testing positive for COVID-19.

For some health experts, however, the scant discussion in Quebec about the pandemic represents a missed opportunity to talk about the lessons learned over the past two years.

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“I’m both surprised and disappointed,” said Dr. Donald Vinh, an infectious disease specialist and medical microbiologist at the McGill University Health Centre, in reference to the lack of discussion about the pandemic on the campaign trail.

He said Quebec has not done enough to prepare for a possible future wave. The incumbent Coalition Avenir Québec party, he added, doesn’t want to talk too much about the pandemic because of the high death toll in the province — 16,754 deaths have been attributed to the disease, the highest number in Canada.

The deaths are “a reflection not only of a virulent pathogen and an at-risk population but (they) also tell us that our health-care system is extremely fragile,” Vinh said in an interview Tuesday, adding that Quebec’s health network remains severely understaffed and that the number of vulnerable people is growing as the population ages.

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Vinh said Quebec’s political parties aren’t talking about the pandemic because voters are ready to move on. “I think most people don’t want to hear about COVID anymore and that’s why there’s no outcry.”

Daniel Weinstock, a professor at McGill University’s institute for health and social policy, said he agrees that public opinion is likely part of the reason the pandemic isn’t a prominent topic during the campaign.

While the vast majority of eligible Canadians got two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, uptake of third and fourth doses has been far lower, a sign, Weinstock said, that people want to live in a post-pandemic world.

“It could be that at the end of the day that is the main reason why everybody in this race, the opposition parties, have decided that, even though there’s a rational reason to question the government’s handling of the pandemic — especially in its earlier phases — this is just not something that the population wants to hear. It’s not a vote-getter,” he said.

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Weinstock, however, said he’s disappointed that CAQ Leader François Legault on the campaign trail hasn’t really had to defend his government’s use of emergency powers during the pandemic. “I’ve been disappointed at the lack of bandwidth that’s been occupied by this government’s relatively cavalier manner with liberal democratic rights and freedoms.”

Only Conservative Party of Quebec Leader Éric Duhaime has regularly criticized the way Legault handled the pandemic.

But Montpetit said those criticisms are mostly intended to appeal to Duhaime’s base — and they largely came before the election campaign. The Conservative party leader has focused less often on pandemic measures in recent weeks as he looks to broaden his appeal, Montpetit said.

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Legault managed to remain popular throughout the pandemic because his health orders followed public opinion, Montpetit said.

During the early waves of the disease, the government’s strict measures were broadly popular. But public sentiment changed in December 2021 and January 2022, when opinion polls began showing that the measures — including the curfew — were losing support. In response, Legault quickly changed course.

“Most people are under the impression that Legault did what he could, that he did a good job, (that) it was a difficult job and someone else wouldn’t have done better than him,” Montpetit said.

“So in this context, it’s clear that Francois Legault’s adversaries have absolutely no interest in raising this issue and I think that’s why we don’t talk about it during the campaign.”

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Paramedics wheel a resident out of CHSLD Herron during the first wave of the pandemic.
Paramedics wheel a resident out of CHSLD Herron during the first wave of the pandemic. Photo by John Mahoney /Montreal Gazette

2:30 p.m.

Opinion: It’s vital that English-speaking Quebecers’ voices be heard

“As we head to the polls Monday, English-speaking Quebecers have the power to make a difference. We have a voice. Let’s use it.”

Read the full opinion piece, by Eva Ludvig, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network.


1:45 p.m.

PQ leader defends candidates’ comments on Islam, racial profiling

Parti Québécois Leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon is defending a candidate who wondered why “’visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested.”

The comment was made in November 2021 on Twitter by Suzanne Gagnon, the PQ candidate in La Pinière on Montreal’s South Shore, according to reports. The tweet is no longer visible.

TVA reports that she wrote: “Why do visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested? I would like to get an answer from someone who is part of it. Thanks.”

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On Wednesday, Plamondon defended the remarks, saying she wrote a follow-up tweet that cleared up the issue.

Two months after her initial comment, Gagnon tweeted:: “Racial profiling exists among some members of law enforcement, and I in no way condone their abuse of power and force towards visible minorities, especially, or any other individual! But resisting is not a solution!”

St-Pierre Plamondon said Gagnon recognized that racial profiling exists. “Clearly, her intention is that she is concerned about the injuries suffered during the arrests of people among visible minorities,” he said.

The PQ leader also defended Lyne Jubinville, the Parti Québécois candidate in Laval’s Ste-Rose riding, in the wake of a Le Devoir report on her previous anti-Islam statements. (See item below, timestamped 9:20 a.m.)

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St-Pierre Plamondon said Jubinville’s comments were not Islamophobic because she targeted other religions.

“You can’t put the word ‘phobia’ on any criticism of religions,” St-Pierre Plamondon said. “There is no way to target all of her remarks as targeting a single religion.”

From a feminist perspective, criticizing religions is legitimate, he added. “Questioning religions … in terms of women’s rights is a criticism that is necessary.”

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1:40 p.m.

Anglade meets Quebec City’s mayor

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1:30 p.m.

Only 7% of French-speaking Quebecers think language rights are an issue, poll suggests

A new poll from the Angus-Reid Institute looked at the top election issues among voters.

“The issue of language clearly divides anglophones and francophones,” the polling firm said.

“More than half (54 per cent) of English-speaking Quebecers say language rights are a top issue for them. Fewer than one-in-ten (seven per cent) French-speaking respondents agree.”

Over the past nine months, Angus Reid polls have found the governing Coalition Avenir Québec and the opposition Québec solidaire have held steady. The Conservatives and Parti Québécois have risen in popularity. Interest in voting Liberal has declined.

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The full poll results are available on this page on the Angus Reid Institute website.


1:20 p.m.

For elections and asteroids alike, Philippe Fournier has our numbers

When not analyzing poll numbers, Philippe Fournier has been a prof at CEGEP de Saint-Laurent, teaching courses in physics, astrophysics and astronomy for the last 20 years. He earned degrees in astrophysics at McGill and Université Laval, and later did some blissful telescope research “with lots of stars” at Mont Mégantic in the Eastern Townships.

Read our full story, by Bill Brownstein.


12:25 p.m.

Boulet should be turfed immediately, Bloc Montréal says

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12:05 p.m.

Legault says Boulet would not return as immigration minister

In interviews on TVA and Radio-Canada today, Coalition Avenir Québec Leader François Legault said Jean Boulet will not be immigration minister if the CAQ is re-elected on Oct. 3.

Legault said “for reasons of perception and confidence” Boulet has “disqualified” himself as a future minister of immigration.


Noon

Responding to Boulet, Plante says immigrants contribute to Montreal’s ‘economic, social and cultural vitality and to the dynamism of French’

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Noon

‘Pathetic’ – Duhaime criticizes immigration comments by Legault and Boulet

Éric Duhaime has described as “pathetic” the latest controversial statements about immigration from François Legault and Jean Boulet.

Legault is the incumbent premier and leader of the Coalition Avenir Québec while Boulet is a CAQ MNA and the outgoing immigration minister.

“It’s pathetic because it’s not the first time,” Duhaime said about the statements.

Speaking at a press conference in Quebec City, he said both Legault and Boulet have repeatedly made contentious statements about immigration.

In a recent debate, Boulet said “80 per cent of immigrants go to Montreal, do not work, do not speak French or do not adhere to the values of Quebec society.” He has since apologized.

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Duhaime said all of Boulet’s points were false: “We know it’s not true.”

The Conservative leader said if he had said something like that, “I would probably already be politically disqualified.”

There have been so many controversial CAQ statements about immigration, followed by apologies, that “at one point we’ll have to wonder is it really a mistake or are they trying to send a mixed signal because it’s going on and on and on,” Duhaime said.

He said “It’s really concerning. Obviously, the CAQ has a problem with immigration.”

Duhaime added: “It’s not by seeing other people – immigrants or non-francophones – as a threat that we’re going to be able to survive as francophones in North America. That’s the difference between myself and Mr. Legault. Mr. Legault thinks that the immigrants and the non-francophones are the problem; I think they’re part of the solution.”

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Watch his press conference: 

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11:25 a.m.

Liberals are the only party that consistently ‘values the contribution of all Quebecers,’ Anglade says

Dominique Anglade says François Legault “keeps dividing Quebecers” on issues such as immigration.

She was responding to questions about comments by Legault, the Coalition Avenir Québec leader, and one of his candidates, Jean Boulet, about immigration.

Anglade, the Liberal leader, said their controversial comments “don’t reflect who we are as Quebecers.”

She said the Quebec Liberal Party is the only “party that doesn’t want to divide, that wants to unite, that is very consistent in terms of openness, in terms of valuing the contribution of all Quebecers.

“What I’m asking Quebecers is to go out and vote on Oct. 3. More than 60 per cent of the population doesn’t want to have François Legault as the premier. Go out and vote.”

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Watch her press conference:

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11:10 a.m.

Aislin’s take

Editorial cartoon for Sept. 29, 2022
Editorial cartoon for Sept. 29, 2022 Photo by Aislin

11:05 a.m.

Liberal denounces Boulet’s ‘prejudiced’ comments on immigration

Via Twitter this morning, Isabelle Malançon, the incumbent Liberal MNA for Verdun who is seeking re-election, denounced the comments made by Jean Boulet, a Coalition Avenir Québec candidate and current labour and immigration minister.

(See item below, timestamped 9:35 a.m.)  

“Unacceptable comments!” Malançon tweeted.

“These prejudices do not correspond to what I see on the ground in Verdun. It is deplorable to see that this is what the outgoing labour minister thinks.”


10:55 a.m.

‘Hurtful, rude and irresponsible’ – Nadeau-Dubois slams Legault on immigration

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois says he is outraged after François Legault suggested accepting more than 50,000 immigrants annually would be “suicidal” for Quebec.

Via Twitter, Nadeau-Dubois, the co-spokesperson for Québec solidaire, said: “Suicide is killing yourself. François Legault believes that welcoming more immigrants is the death of the Quebec nation. That’s what he said. These are hurtful, rude and irresponsible comments.”


10:55 a.m.

Quebecers are less than impressed with all party leaders, poll suggests

Coalition Avenir Québec Leader Francois Legault, the perceived frontrunner in the Quebec election campaign, is viewed unfavourably by more than half of province’s electorate, a new survey suggests.

Read our full story.


10:50 a.m.

Accepting more than 50,000 immigrants annually would be ‘a bit suicidal’ for Quebec, François Legault says

François Legault says he ‘very much regrets’ Jean Boulet’s comment on immigrants

“Jean made a grave error – it’s not true what he said,” Legault told reporters at a press conference after a speech to the Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal.

Legault said he “very much regrets” the comments (see item below, timestamped 9:35 a.m.)

The Coalition Avenir Québec leader said Boulet, a CAQ candidate and currently the immigration minister, knows what he said was false.

Legault said Boulet made the statement “in the heat of the action” during a debate but that doesn’t justify what he said.

A reporter asked Legault if he stands by a statement about immigration that he himself made in his speech this morning.

He said that accepting more than 50,000 immigrants would be “suicidal” for “the Quebec nation.”

“It’s an expression in Quebec to say that if we increase the number of immigrants while French is in decline, it would be a bit suicidal for French,” Legault said in response.

“I think everyone understands what that means. We have to stop the decline (in French). It’s not by increasing immigration that we’ll stop the decline of French.”

Watch the press conference:

We apologize, but this video has failed to load.

You can watch Legault’s speech to the Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal:

We apologize, but this video has failed to load.


9:35 a.m.

80% of immigrants ‘don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values,’ CAQ minister says

The vast majority of immigrants to Quebec don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values, an outgoing Coalition Avenir Québec minister says.

Jean Boulet, an incumbent CAQ MNA who currently holds the immigration and labour portfolios in François Legault’s government, made the statement at a radio debate for candidates in Trois-Rivières riding last week that was not widely reported.

The candidates were asked about immigration and the labour shortage.

“Eighty per cent of immigrants go to Montreal, do not work, do not speak French or do not adhere to the values of Quebec society,” Boulet said.

He said the solution is “regionalization and francization,” meaning more immigrants should settle in Quebec regions and the province has to ensure immigrants speak French.

After the comments were reported this morning, Boulet took to Twitter.

“I’m sorry for expressing my thoughts badly,” he tweeted. “The excerpt broadcast does not reflect what I think. We must continue to focus on the reception, francization and integration of immigrants, who are a source of wealth for Quebec. ”

It’s not the first time Boulet has stirred controversy with a statement about immigration.

In a December 2021 tweet, Boulet implied asylum seekers were bringing COVID-19 into the province.

At the time, he was worried about the arrival of refugees via Roxham Road in the midst of a pandemic and asked the federal government to close this route of entry into the country.

Boulet made his latest comment about immigrants in the video below, around the 1:33 mark:

Émission spéciale : débat électoral

Revoyez le débat électoral sur Facebook avec les candidats des cinq principaux partis de Trois-Rivières animé par Marie-Claude Julien lors de l’émission Toujours le matin. Vous pourrez aussi le suivre sur notre site internet radio-canada.ca/mauricie ainsi qu’à la radio au 96.5 FM et en Haute-Mauricie au 103,7 FM.

Posted by ICI Mauricie Centre-du-Québec on Monday, September 19, 2022


9:20 a.m.

PQ candidate ‘retracts certain comments’ after report on her anti-Islam statements

In the wake of a Le Devoir report on her previous anti-Islam statements, Lyne Jubinville, the Parti Québécois candidate in Laval’s Ste-Rose riding, has published a Facebook statement to “clarify and retract certain comments.”

Le Devoir reported yesterday on several comments Jubinville has made over the years regarding hijabs and Islam.

“Islam is not us: we have nothing to do with it, we don’t know that!!!” she wrote on one occasion. Another time, she said she was offended to see “the hijabs invading more and more our public landscape”.

At one point, she wrote about “veiled women” on Ste-Catherine St. in Montreal: “Welcome home, people from other countries. But don’t count on us to build you mosques and let your muezzins announce the call to prayer in the middle of the street when our churches are for sale and our bells are increasingly silent.”

In her Facebook post after the Le Devoir story was published, Jubinville said: “I fully recognize the right of new Quebecers and of all Quebecers to believe in God and to go to the places of worship of their choice according to their religion. Although I am very critical of the effect of religions on women’s rights, I recognize that everyone in Quebec is entitled to their beliefs and therefore has the right to practice their religion.”

She added: “I also want to make it clear that my critical comments about religions apply to all religions and not one in particular. My critical mind is aimed at religious fundamentalism and not at one religion in particular. I recognize and have often affirmed that religious fundamentalism is found in all monotheistic religions. As I have published on several occasions, I believe that secularism and a healthy reserve regarding religion in the public space preserve the right of each religion to exist in social peace and tranquillity.”


8:45 a.m.

CAQ could win fewer votes but 15 more seats than it did in massive 2018 victory, projections suggest


8:45 a.m.

Canadian Party’s main target in ad campaign is the Quebec Liberal Party


8:45 a.m.

CAQ worker highlights ‘misogynist and violent’ lyrics in TikTok video featuring Nadeau-Dubois and Massé


8:45 a.m.

Anglade’s daughter wasn’t too impressed with mom’s ’embarrassing’ dance on debate night


8:40 a.m.

Paul St-Pierre Plamondon loyal to sovereignty, come what may for PQ

At the forefront of the Parti Québécois charge toward independence is Paul St-Pierre Plamondon, also known as PSPP, a youthful 45-year-old former lawyer who has promised since he was named leader in October 2020 the party’s focus would be on its foundational raison d’être.

Read our full profile, by René Bruemmer.

PQ Leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon profile
Parti Québécois leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon, centre, speaks with Albert Michaud during his morning stop at restaurant in Mascouche on Tuesday, September 27, 2022. Photo by Pierre Obendrauf /Montreal Gazette

8:40 a.m.

Opinion: In Quebec, transportation and the environment go hand in hand

“François Legault may accuse Montrealers of interfering and “looking down on” the concerns of commuters from Lévis in questioning the need for a new multi-billion span.

“But the third link is a matter that affects all Quebecers. Whether it gets built and the form it takes may determine Quebec’s ability to reach even the most modest emissions reduction targets by 2030.”

Read Allison Hanes’ full column.


8:30 a.m.

What are the five major parties taking part in Quebec’s provincial election?

Here’s a look at the five parties vying to form Quebec’s next government.

Read our full story.


8:30 a.m.

Election Guide: What you need to know about the campaign and voting

How do you check if you’re on the electoral list? Are you allowed to vote? When can ballots be cast?

Read our full story.


8:30 a.m.

Sign up for our free Quebec election newsletter

Follow all the action along Quebec’s 2022 provincial election campaign trail with coverage and analysis from the experts at the Montreal Gazette.

Delivered Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 7 p.m.

You can sign up here.


ariga@postmedia.com

Read my previous live blogs here.


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Bel Canto e1X DAC/Control Preamplifier

My late father-in-law used to say that life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer you get to the end, the quicker it passes. I was reminded of that when I was asked to review Bel Canto’s new e1X DAC/Control Preamplifier ($6800). It didn’t seem that long ago that I favorably reviewed the Minnesota company’s e.One DAC3, but Google told me that it was 15 years ago! “Other than the jitter performance via its USB input, the Bel Canto e.One DAC3 is the best-measuring digital component I have encountered,” I wrote in November 2007 (footnote 1), adding that it “offers some impressive audio engineering in both the digital and analog domains.”

The e1X DAC
The first product from Bel Canto’s e1X series to be reviewed in Stereophile was the e1X power amplifier, in June 2020, which got a thumbs-up from Tom Gibbs. The e1X DAC was shown at the 2019 AXPONA, but production was delayed by pandemic supply-chain issues. A sample became available for review in the spring of 2022.

The e1X DAC is a smart-looking, full-width component in a black-anodized aluminum case. The front panel features a large, rectangular, white-on-black alphanumeric display, a control knob, and a ¼” headphone jack. The rear panel features AES3, coaxial and optical S/PDIF, and USB digital inputs as well as a UPnP/DLNA-compatible Ethernet port. The USB and Ethernet ports support MQA-encoded data and DSD data in the DoP format (DSD64 via the network connection; DSD64 and ‘128 with the USB port). There is also a USB-A port for plugging in a FAT32-formatted drive.

In addition to balanced and single-ended analog outputs, each of which can be used with fixed or variable gain, there are four pairs of RCA jacks. Two pairs are for line-level analog inputs, both with a selectable Home Theater Bypass mode, one pair is for a MC/MM phono input—there’s also a grounding lug for use with this input—and the fourth pair can be used to feed a powered subwoofer. The signals fed to the line-level analog inputs and the phono input are converted to digital. According to John Stronczer, Bel Canto’s founder, CEO, and chief of design, digitizing the phono input makes it less susceptible to picking up noise than a purely analog phono stage. Once converted to digital, analog signals can then be adjusted with the DSP-domain controls like Tilt and Bass EQ, as well as the volume control.

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The front-panel knob controls volume; with a gentle push, it also allows selection of different sources. All the other settings, including switching the output between the line-level jacks and the headphone jack, controlling the channel balance, Tilt, Bass EQ, Subwoofer filter and gain settings, Home Theater Bypass, and phono-input gain and load options, plus firmware updates and factory resets, are accessed by pressing the Program button on the remote control then rotating the knob. Changes can then be made with the knob or the remote’s up and down buttons. Pressing and holding the knob or the remote’s Program button allows any changes to be saved.

The digital-domain Tilt control is virtually identical to the analog control found in the 1980s-vintage Quad 34 preamplifier. As the name suggests, this control tilts the frequency response by up to ±3dB above and below a hinge frequency close to 1kHz. Each of the 10 steps changes the tilt by ±0.6dB. The Bass EQ control applies a boost or cut of up to 3dB below 100Hz, again in 0.6dB steps. The Subwoofer control adjusts the gain at the subwoofer output and sets the low-pass filter’s turnover frequency between 40Hz and 120Hz in 10Hz increments. The Main outputs can have a similar high-pass filter applied or left off.

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Pressing the Display button on the remote cycles through several screens. The first displays the source and the volume setting, the second the incoming sample rate and the volume, the third the firmware version, the fourth the equipment selected (in this case, “E1X DAC”), and the fifth turns off the display. (As the display is very bright, I tended to leave it dark.)

The e1X DAC is Roon Ready, so it’s optimized for playing music streamed from Roon. Bel Canto also offers a free UPnP/DLNA iOS app called Seek, which allows audio to be streamed from Qobuz, Tidal, Spotify, and vTuner internet radio and files to be played from DropBox, OneDrive, and iCloud folders, from a drive plugged into the USB-A port, or from local storage on their iDevice. Seek supports playback with resolution and sample rate up to 24 bits and 192kHz.

Technology
A white paper by John Stronczer on the design of the e1X DAC explains that it shares its architectural approach with Bel Canto’s Black system design (footnote 2). “We use a powerful digital architecture, combining asynchronous interface retiming, ultra-low noise master clocks, 32/64-bit DSP and proprietary digital link technologies to achieve superior analog performance,” he writes, adding that the analog performance is defined “by our two-stage High Dynamic Resolution (HDRII) DAC core.”

The DAC chip used, not just in the e1X’s core but in all of Bel Canto’s digital products, is a Burr-Brown (now Texas Instruments) PCM1792A. This two-channel, current-output chip accepts 24-bit data with a sample rate up to 192kHz and offers up to a 130dB dynamic range, depending on the output voltage. (The six most significant bits are processed by a conventional R-2R section; the 18 least significant bits are decoded by a five-level delta-sigma section running at 64 times the clock speed.) The first version of this chip dates from 2003—it was used in the Bel Canto e.One DAC3—and while it’s still in production, the Texas Instruments website says that it is “not recommended for new designs.” Nevertheless, Stronczer says that the PCM1792A “is a high-performance DAC whose musical qualities we have refined over the past 15 years. While newer DAC technologies have come along, none have provided the ultimate performance and unique analog characteristics of the PCM1792A. Continually refining the circuitry and design choices surrounding this DAC core results in a highly dynamic and musically revealing sound.”

The e1X signal path starts with what Stronczer calls an Asynchronous Multi-input Processor (AMiP) board, fed from a dedicated, isolated, linear power supply. This board carries the digital and analog input interfaces as well as the critical pair of ultralow-noise master clocks that retime the digital data. As previously mentioned, the analog inputs are digitized, and all the audio signals travel through the same digital path. The AMiP board includes five digital signal processors, one of which contains the MQA Decode and Rendering function. This processor bypasses the 8×-oversampling filter incorporated in the Burr-Brown DAC chip, instead implementing MQA-derived filters for PCM and DSD data. A 32-bit ARM processor is dedicated to the user interface and internal control functions, and a 32-/64-bit DSP core is used for the Tilt, Bass EQ, and Subwoofer crossover controls.

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“The digital signal from the AMiP board is sent to the HDRII DAC board through a proprietary interface,” Stronczer writes. “The HDRII board includes its own asynchronous … ultra–low-noise master clock. This and the AMiP board provide two series stages of aggressive jitter rejection from any incoming digital data source. … Our architectural choices preserve signal integrity by maximizing the performance of both the I/V and voltage amplifier stages. In this way, the 32-bit digital volume and balance controls are used to preserve the >126dB dynamic range of the DAC core.”

The e1X’s I/V and voltage-gain stages operate in class-A, and the passive components “are biased with constant DC current and voltage for highest dynamic linearity.”

Listening with Roon
The e1X DAC is a complex and complicated component. For my first round of listening, I set the processor’s gain to variable, with the default maximum setting of “85,” and used Roon 1.8 to stream audio data from the internal drive in my Nucleus+ server over my network. I fed the Bel Canto’s balanced outputs to the Parasound Halo JC 1+ monoblock amplifiers. The amplifiers were set to their lower input sensitivity, which meant I used the e1X’s volume control set with Roon, Seek, or the remote control between “67” and “77.”


Footnote 1: Dick Olsher reviewed Bel Canto’s first digital product, the Aida D/A processor, in Stereophile‘s November 1994 issue.

Footnote 2: Michael Fremer reviewed the Bel Canto Black system for Stereophile in June 2015.


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Live – Quebec election: PQ leader defends candidate who wondered why ‘visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested’

Opponents slam François Legault for saying a hike in immigration would be ‘suicidal’ for Quebec. CAQ candidate apologizes for suggesting 80% of immigrants “don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values.”

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Updated throughout the day on Wednesday, Sept. 28. Questions/comments: ariga@postmedia.com

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Top updates

  • PQ leader defends candidate who wondered why ‘visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested’
  • Only 7% of French-speaking Quebecers think language rights are an issue, poll suggests
  • For elections and asteroids alike, Philippe Fournier has our numbers
  • Boulet should be turfed immediately, Bloc Montréal says
  • Legault says Boulet would not return as immigration minister
  • Responding to Boulet, Plante says immigrants contribute to Montreal’s ‘economic, social and cultural vitality and to the dynamism of French’
  • ‘Pathetic’ – Duhaime criticizes immigration comments by Legault and Boulet
  • Liberals are the only party that consistently ‘values the contribution of all Quebecers,’ Anglade says
  • Aislin’s take
  • Liberal denounces Boulet’s ‘prejudiced’ comments on immigration
  • ‘Hurtful, rude and irresponsible’ – Nadeau-Dubois slams Legault on immigration
  • Quebecers are less than impressed with all party leaders, poll suggests
  • Accepting more than 50,000 immigrants annually would be ‘a bit suicidal’ for Quebec, Legault says
  • 80% of immigrants ‘don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values,’ CAQ minister says
  • PQ candidate ‘retracts certain comments’ after report on her anti-Islam statements
  • CAQ could win fewer votes but 15 more seats than in massive 2018 victory, projections suggest
  • Canadian Party’s main target in ad campaign is the Quebec Liberal Party
  • CAQ worker highlights ‘misogynist and violent’ lyrics in TikTok video featuring Nadeau-Dubois and Massé
  • Anglade’s daughter wasn’t too impressed with mom’s ’embarrassing’ dance on debate night
  • Paul St-Pierre Plamondon loyal to sovereignty, come what may for PQ
  • Election Guide: What you need to know about the campaign and voting
  • Sign up for our free Quebec election newsletter

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1:45 p.m.

leader defends candidate who wondered why ‘visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested’

Parti Québécois Leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon is defending a candidate who wondered why “’visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested.”

The comment was made in November 2021 on Twitter by Suzanne Gagnon, the PQ candidate in La Pinière on Montreal’s South Shore, according to reports. The tweet is no longer visible.

TVA reports that she wrote: “Why do visible minorities resist so much when they are arrested? I would like to get an answer from someone who is part of it. Thanks.”

On Wednesday, Plamondon defended the remarks, saying she wrote a follow-up tweet that cleared up the issue.

Two months later, Gagnon tweeted: “Racial profiling exists among some members of law enforcement, and I in no way condone their abuse of power and force towards visible minorities, especially, or any other individual! But resisting is not a solution!”

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Plamondon also defended Lyne Jubinville, the Parti Québécois candidate in Laval’s Ste-Rose riding, in the wake of a Le Devoir report on her previous anti-Islam statements. (See item below, timestamped 9:20 a.m.)

The PQ leader said Jubinville’s comments were not Islamophobic because she targeted other religions.

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1:40 p.m.

Anglade meets Quebec City’s mayor

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1:30 p.m.

Only 7% of French-speaking Quebecers think language rights are an issue, poll suggests

A new poll from the Angus-Reid Institute looked at the top election issues among voters.

“The issue of language clearly divides anglophones and francophones,” the polling firm said.

“More than half (54 per cent) of English-speaking Quebecers say language rights are a top issue for them. Fewer than one-in-ten (seven per cent) French-speaking respondents agree.”

Over the past nine months, Angus Reid polls have found the governing Coalition Avenir Québec and the opposition Québec solidaire have held steady. The Conservatives and Parti Québécois have risen in popularity. Interest in voting Liberal has declined.

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The full poll results are available on this page on the Angus Reid Institute website.


1:20 p.m.

For elections and asteroids alike, Philippe Fournier has our numbers

When not analyzing poll numbers, Philippe Fournier has been a prof at CEGEP de Saint-Laurent, teaching courses in physics, astrophysics and astronomy for the last 20 years. He earned degrees in astrophysics at McGill and Université Laval, and later did some blissful telescope research “with lots of stars” at Mont Mégantic in the Eastern Townships.

Read our full story, by Bill Brownstein.


12:25 p.m.

Boulet should be turfed immediately, Bloc Montréal says

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12:05 p.m.

Legault says Boulet would not return as immigration minister

In interviews on TVA and Radio-Canada today, Coalition Avenir Québec Leader François Legault said Jean Boulet will not be immigration minister if the CAQ is re-elected on Oct. 3.

Legault said “for reasons of perception and confidence” Boulet has “disqualified” himself as a future minister of immigration.


Noon

Responding to Boulet, Plante says immigrants contribute to Montreal’s ‘economic, social and cultural vitality and to the dynamism of French’

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Noon

‘Pathetic’ – Duhaime criticizes immigration comments by Legault and Boulet

Éric Duhaime has described as “pathetic” the latest controversial statements about immigration from François Legault and Jean Boulet.

Legault is the incumbent premier and leader of the Coalition Avenir Québec while Boulet is a CAQ MNA and the outgoing immigration minister.

“It’s pathetic because it’s not the first time,” Duhaime said about the statements.

Speaking at a press conference in Quebec City, he said both Legault and Boulet have repeatedly made contentious statements about immigration.

In a recent debate, Boulet said “80 per cent of immigrants go to Montreal, do not work, do not speak French or do not adhere to the values of Quebec society.” He has since apologized.

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Duhaime said all of Boulet’s points were false: “We know it’s not true.”

The Conservative leader said if he had said something like that, “I would probably already be politically disqualified.”

There have been so many controversial CAQ statements about immigration, followed by apologies, that “at one point we’ll have to wonder is it really a mistake or are they trying to send a mixed signal because it’s going on and on and on,” Duhaime said.

He said “It’s really concerning. Obviously, the CAQ has a problem with immigration.”

Duhaime added: “It’s not by seeing other people – immigrants or non-francophones – as a threat that we’re going to be able to survive as francophones in North America. That’s the difference between myself and Mr. Legault. Mr. Legault thinks that the immigrants and the non-francophones are the problem; I think they’re part of the solution.”

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Watch his press conference: 

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11:25 a.m.

Liberals are the only party that consistently ‘values the contribution of all Quebecers,’ Anglade says

Dominique Anglade says François Legault “keeps dividing Quebecers” on issues such as immigration.

She was responding to questions about comments by Legault, the Coalition Avenir Québec leader, and one of his candidates, Jean Boulet, about immigration.

Anglade, the Liberal leader, said their controversial comments “don’t reflect who we are as Quebecers.”

She said the Quebec Liberal Party is the only “party that doesn’t want to divide, that wants to unite, that is very consistent in terms of openness, in terms of valuing the contribution of all Quebecers.

“What I’m asking Quebecers is to go out and vote on Oct. 3. More than 60 per cent of the population doesn’t want to have François Legault as the premier. Go out and vote.”

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Watch her press conference:

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11:10 a.m.

Aislin’s take

Editorial cartoon for Sept. 29, 2022
Editorial cartoon for Sept. 29, 2022 Photo by Aislin

11:05 a.m.

Liberal denounces Boulet’s ‘prejudiced’ comments on immigration

Via Twitter this morning, Isabelle Malançon, the incumbent Liberal MNA for Verdun who is seeking re-election, denounced the comments made by Jean Boulet, a Coalition Avenir Québec candidate and current labour and immigration minister.

(See item below, timestamped 9:35 a.m.)  

“Unacceptable comments!” Malançon tweeted.

“These prejudices do not correspond to what I see on the ground in Verdun. It is deplorable to see that this is what the outgoing labour minister thinks.”

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10:55 a.m.

‘Hurtful, rude and irresponsible’ – Nadeau-Dubois slams Legault on immigration

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois says he is outraged after François Legault suggested accepting more than 50,000 immigrants annually would be “suicidal” for Quebec.

Via Twitter, Nadeau-Dubois, the co-spokesperson for Québec solidaire, said: “Suicide is killing yourself. François Legault believes that welcoming more immigrants is the death of the Quebec nation. That’s what he said. These are hurtful, rude and irresponsible comments.”

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10:55 a.m.

Quebecers are less than impressed with all party leaders, poll suggests

Coalition Avenir Québec Leader Francois Legault, the perceived frontrunner in the Quebec election campaign, is viewed unfavourably by more than half of province’s electorate, a new survey suggests.

Read our full story.


10:50 a.m.

Accepting more than 50,000 immigrants annually would be ‘a bit suicidal’ for Quebec, François Legault says

François Legault says he ‘very much regrets’ Jean Boulet’s comment on immigrants

“Jean made a grave error – it’s not true what he said,” Legault told reporters at a press conference after a speech to the Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal.

Legault said he “very much regrets” the comments (see item below, timestamped 9:35 a.m.)

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The Coalition Avenir Québec leader said Boulet, a CAQ candidate and currently the immigration minister, knows what he said was false.

Legault said Boulet made the statement “in the heat of the action” during a debate but that doesn’t justify what he said.

A reporter asked Legault if he stands by a statement about immigration that he himself made in his speech this morning.

He said that accepting more than 50,000 immigrants would be “suicidal” for “the Quebec nation.”

“It’s an expression in Quebec to say that if we increase the number of immigrants while French is in decline, it would be a bit suicidal for French,” Legault said in response.

“I think everyone understands what that means. We have to stop the decline (in French). It’s not by increasing immigration that we’ll stop the decline of French.”

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Watch the press conference:

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You can watch Legault’s speech to the Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal:

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9:35 a.m.

80% of immigrants ‘don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values,’ CAQ minister says

The vast majority of immigrants to Quebec don’t work, don’t speak French or don’t adhere to Quebec values, an outgoing Coalition Avenir Québec minister says.

Jean Boulet, an incumbent CAQ MNA who currently holds the immigration and labour portfolios in François Legault’s government, made the statement at a radio debate for candidates in Trois-Rivières riding last week that was not widely reported.

The candidates were asked about immigration and the labour shortage.

“Eighty per cent of immigrants go to Montreal, do not work, do not speak French or do not adhere to the values of Quebec society,” Boulet said.

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He said the solution is “regionalization and francization,” meaning more immigrants should settle in Quebec regions and the province has to ensure immigrants speak French.

After the comments were reported this morning, Boulet took to Twitter.

“I’m sorry for expressing my thoughts badly,” he tweeted. “The excerpt broadcast does not reflect what I think. We must continue to focus on the reception, francization and integration of immigrants, who are a source of wealth for Quebec. ”

It’s not the first time Boulet has stirred controversy with a statement about immigration.

In a December 2021 tweet, Boulet implied asylum seekers were bringing COVID-19 into the province.

At the time, he was worried about the arrival of refugees via Roxham Road in the midst of a pandemic and asked the federal government to close this route of entry into the country.

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Boulet made his latest comment about immigrants in the video below, around the 1:33 mark:

Émission spéciale : débat électoral

Revoyez le débat électoral sur Facebook avec les candidats des cinq principaux partis de Trois-Rivières animé par Marie-Claude Julien lors de l’émission Toujours le matin. Vous pourrez aussi le suivre sur notre site internet radio-canada.ca/mauricie ainsi qu’à la radio au 96.5 FM et en Haute-Mauricie au 103,7 FM.

Posted by ICI Mauricie Centre-du-Québec on Monday, September 19, 2022

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9:20 a.m.

PQ candidate ‘retracts certain comments’ after report on her anti-Islam statements

In the wake of a Le Devoir report on her previous anti-Islam statements, Lyne Jubinville, the Parti Québécois candidate in Laval’s Ste-Rose riding, has published a Facebook statement to “clarify and retract certain comments.”

Le Devoir reported yesterday on several comments Jubinville has made over the years regarding hijabs and Islam.

“Islam is not us: we have nothing to do with it, we don’t know that!!!” she wrote on one occasion. Another time, she said she was offended to see “the hijabs invading more and more our public landscape”.

At one point, she wrote about “veiled women” on Ste-Catherine St. in Montreal: “Welcome home, people from other countries. But don’t count on us to build you mosques and let your muezzins announce the call to prayer in the middle of the street when our churches are for sale and our bells are increasingly silent.”

In her Facebook post after the Le Devoir story was published, Jubinville said: “I fully recognize the right of new Quebecers and of all Quebecers to believe in God and to go to the places of worship of their choice according to their religion. Although I am very critical of the effect of religions on women’s rights, I recognize that everyone in Quebec is entitled to their beliefs and therefore has the right to practice their religion.”

She added: “I also want to make it clear that my critical comments about religions apply to all religions and not one in particular. My critical mind is aimed at religious fundamentalism and not at one religion in particular. I recognize and have often affirmed that religious fundamentalism is found in all monotheistic religions. As I have published on several occasions, I believe that secularism and a healthy reserve regarding religion in the public space preserve the right of each religion to exist in social peace and tranquillity.”


8:45 a.m.

CAQ could win fewer votes but 15 more seats than it did in massive 2018 victory, projections suggest


8:45 a.m.

Canadian Party’s main target in ad campaign is the Quebec Liberal Party


8:45 a.m.

CAQ worker highlights ‘misogynist and violent’ lyrics in TikTok video featuring Nadeau-Dubois and Massé


8:45 a.m.

Anglade’s daughter wasn’t too impressed with mom’s ’embarrassing’ dance on debate night


8:40 a.m.

Paul St-Pierre Plamondon loyal to sovereignty, come what may for PQ

At the forefront of the Parti Québécois charge toward independence is Paul St-Pierre Plamondon, also known as PSPP, a youthful 45-year-old former lawyer who has promised since he was named leader in October 2020 the party’s focus would be on its foundational raison d’être.

Read our full profile, by René Bruemmer.

PQ Leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon profile
Parti Québécois leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon, centre, speaks with Albert Michaud during his morning stop at restaurant in Mascouche on Tuesday, September 27, 2022. Photo by Pierre Obendrauf /Montreal Gazette

8:40 a.m.

Opinion: In Quebec, transportation and the environment go hand in hand

François Legault may accuse Montrealers of interfering and “looking down on” the concerns of commuters from Lévis in questioning the need for a new multi-billion span. But the third link is a matter that affects all Quebecers. Whether it gets built and the form it takes may determine Quebec’s ability to reach even the most modest emissions reduction targets by 2030.

Read Allison Hanes’ full column.


8:30 a.m.

What are the five major parties taking part in Quebec’s provincial election?

Here’s a look at the five parties vying to form Quebec’s next government.

Read our full story.


8:30 a.m.

Election Guide: What you need to know about the campaign and voting

How do you check if you’re on the electoral list? Are you allowed to vote? When can ballots be cast?

Read our full story.


8:30 a.m.

Sign up for our free Quebec election newsletter

Follow all the action along Quebec’s 2022 provincial election campaign trail with coverage and analysis from the experts at the Montreal Gazette.

Delivered Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 7 p.m.

You can sign up here.


ariga@postmedia.com

Read my previous live blogs here.


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Africa’s independent Greek radio | Cyprus Mail

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As is common practice with almost all professional websites, https://cyprus-mail.com (our “Site”) uses cookies, which are tiny files that are downloaded to your device, to improve your experience.

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BTS member V turned DJ for a radio show. Video of him dancing to J-hope’s Rush Hour goes viral

BTS member V recently turned DJ for ARMYs. Videos of him from the radio station has been going viral on the internet.

BTS member V turned DJ for a radio show.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • BTS V turned DJ V for ARMYs.
  • Several videos of him from the radio station has gone viral on the internet.
  • BTS member V is currently working on his solo album.

BTS member V, on September 27, appeared as DJ V for the radio show, Starry Nights. He enthralled the audience and was seen showing finger-heart and cute gestures to fans (ARMY) queuing to see him. Donning a white T-shirt with a mustard-coloured jacket and jeans, V sported a bunny hat making for quite a relaxed visual. ARMY in South Korea gathered in huge numbers to cheer Kim Taehyung as he made his debut as a DJ.

BTS V TURNS DJ

About the same, he said on the radio, “The reason why I wanted to be a DJ & not a guest was because I remember this very well. I think it was about 2/3 years ago, I received a letter from a fan. It said they wish for me [to be a DJ] someday if it’s possible, because they think their insomnia might be cured.” Not just that, he was also seen dancing to the recently released song, Rush Hour, which featured rapper Crush and J-hope. A video of the same has been going viral on the internet.

ABOUT BTS MEMBER V

Earlier, during the week, V chatted with fans on Weverse and made some revelations. He also revealed that he is reworking on his upcoming solo album. The vocalist also said that he has his friendship tattoo on his ‘left butt’ and also spoke about his favourite jazz artist.

In October, BTS will be conducting a free concert in Busan, as part of their ambassador duty for the Busan World Expo bid. The concert will be held on October 15.

— ENDS —




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75orLess Records rings in 16 years at Askew

By ROB DUGUAY

Since its beginnings back in 2006, 75orLess Records has become one of the most vital entities within Rhode Island’s music scene and beyond. Rising from a music review site under the same name, the Warren based record label has specialized in indie, punk and garage rock while also catering to non-commercial and non-traditional music styles. Some records that have been released through the label have come from bands and musicians who perform regularly around these parts while others are strictly studio projects by folks who like to create interesting sounds. Above all else, 75orLess has always championed the weird & peculiar while supporting all sorts of sonic art in a real & genuine way. To celebrate 16 years of 75orLess’ existence, a bunch of bands will be getting together at Askew on 150 Chestnut Street in Providence for back-to-back shows on October 7 and 8.

The extravaganza was originally supposed to happen last year to ring in 75orLess’ 15th anniversary, but because of COVID-19 it got pushed back. Owner and operator Mark “Slick” MacDougall then proceeded to get a bunch of bands on the bills for both nights, including his own in Six Star General who will be as part of the lineup for the second installment.

“We typically do this every five years, but due to COVID-19, it was delayed a year,” MacDougall says about putting together the shows. “I asked my favorite and most available bands to play. The 10th year anniversary was three days of bands, but this year’s is only two days. A lot of bands I usually ask I had to skip this time around. My apologies to those bands that got skipped over this year.”

“Technology has put the tools into the hands of the musician, from digital distribution to Bandcamp allowing you to sell physical merch, as well as downloads,” he adds about the state of running an independent record label in 2022. “Things have become easier for the musician who has the desire to get directly involved with technology and social media. There are still those who prefer to have the label handle getting music onto iTunes and Spotify and similar streaming services. Also, CDs are less in demand overall. In 2021, we had nine digital-only releases, so that seems to be the future. Things have slowed down since the pandemic and where we used to do 10-15 releases per year, we’ve only done limited CD releases and more digital singles and albums, and also one or two books which is fine by me.” 

Along with running the label, MacDougall has been involved with a podcast called “That’s Not Incredible” that’s recorded in Warren. He’s also recognized that 75orLess’ roster mostly consists of music scene veterans so the present goals for what’s being released are more centralized and not too far-fetched.

“For the past year, I have been spending more time doing a podcast, which functions more like an internet radio show, with Warren-based artist Will Schaff playing mostly non-label music,” he says about “That’s Not Incredible”. “The label bands I tend to work with now are older, with realistic goals of what we can accomplish together. This means getting good press reviews, sending out promos and getting some radio airplay from local stations. My bands don’t tour and most don’t do vinyl, so there’s less pressure to ‘break’ them into the big time. Vinyl costs are increasing and delays are getting longer and it’s a big commitment to wait from when a recording is mixed and mastered and when it is released on vinyl.”

The first night of 75orLess’ 16th Anniversary Bash will have Hope Anchor, The Patsy Decline, Exploding Zones, Jodie Treolar Sampson, Thomas Moorecroft and Jets Can’t Land taking the stage. The latter act includes guitarist Kyle Jackson, who also plays with MacDougall in Six Star General.

“I’ve been around since the beginning of the label and have attended and performed at both the 5th and 10th anniversary shows,” Jackson says about 75orLess. “These shows are always ripping with not only a laundry list of great bands from the label playing, but also some of the most fun shows to be at as a spectator. I expect nothing less from the 16th Anniversary Bash, two nights of 75orLess bands at Askew and it will be nothing less than radical. Jets Can’t Land is very happy to be part of the label and the anniversary show. [Drummer] Keith Swist’s tattoo of the 75orLess Records logo on his leg pretty much sums up our love for ‘Slick’ and 75orLess.”

“Everyone in Jets Can’t Land has been in more than one 75orLess band,” Swist adds. “I’ve been in three myself, we may be the most 75orLess band there is.”

“75orLess is a collection of musicians and songwriters all curated by a masterful and encyclopedic music guru,” Jets Can’t Land’s guitarist & vocalist Eric Paul Meier also mentions. “‘Slick’ is, in my humble opinion, a focal point for the music scene in our small state. These shows will be a blast.”

Joining Six Star General for the second evening will be The David Tessier All-Star Stars, Baby Oil, The Matt Fraza Band, Coma Coma, The Glare, Bloodfeeder, The Wire Chimes and Foul Weather Friend. MacDougall is actually the one who came up with the name for Tessier’s band and Tessier is excited about the upcoming celebration.

“75orLess has been nothing but supportive towards any crazy ideas I’ve had,” Tessier says about his relationship with the label. “Mark is a true believer, he really loves music, he’s got a giant heart and he named my band, so what can I say? I love that guy and that guy’s label. Our shows for 75orLess events are always high points for us and we’re very much looking forward to the chance to play on a bill at a great venue with such great artists.”

The first night will start at 8pm while the following night will start at 6pm. Both times are sharp and right on the dot so don’t be one of those nincompoops who likes to show up fashionably late unless you absolutely have to. For more info on 75orLess, log on to their website at 75ofLessRecords.com. To be in the know about what’s happening at Askew, follow them on Facebook and give their page a like at facebook.com/askewprov.




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THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET  – THISDAYLIVE

Sonny Aragba-Akpore writes there are worries as ITU members meet to discuss the 6G next generation technology 

The future of the internet will dominate discussions at the 2022 International Telecommunications Union (ITU) plenipotentiary conference which began on Monday, September 26. Some 193 -member nations are converging in Bucharest, Romania.

The ITU members will deliberate on the future of telecommunications with sixth generation (6G ) technology topping discussions. Although, the global communities are still trying to grapple with deployment of the Fifth Generation (5G) technology, for which nearly 70 countries are already involved in deployment, the new executive members of ITU management and council, that will be elected tomorrow will inherit the 5G deployment process and begin the race to actualize the mission and vision of the 6G next generation technology which is expected to come on stream by 2030.

The ITU futuristic approach is primarily going to provide a road map for this new technology.

And like its predecessors, 6G networks will probably be broadband cellular networks too in which the coverage area will be divided into small geographical areas called cells

In this regard, many companies  including AnritsuKeysight, Fly, NokiaEricssonHuaweiSamsungLGAppleXiaomiJio, have begun the process for its actualisation as research institutes, Technology Innovation Institute  and countries, United States,  ChinaIndiaJapanSingapore and United Arab Emirates show interest in 6G networks. 

Member states of the ITU meet every four years to choose their new high-level representatives, whose perspectives and goals will set priorities in the telecommunications world. And the same is set to take place this year in Bucharest, Romania, to vote one more time.

 This election is key for the development of 6G since the next officials will likely be charged with establishing discussions on Beyond 5G and standardization.

The process starts on September 29 (tomorrow) to elect five executive viz Secretary-General, Deputy Secretary-General, Director Radiocommunication Bureau, Director Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, and Director Telecommunication Development Bureau. The Radio Regulations Board Membership: 12 seats distributed across the same regions

Nigeria is rooting for one of the 13 slots ceded to Africa. There are15 countries angling for the 13 seats. The Council Membership has 48 member states (countries) distributed across five regions (Americas, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Northern Asia, Africa, and Asia and Australasia).

Candidacies who registered before August 29, are qualified for the elections. So far, 31 candidates have already confirmed their names to compete for the 17 individual positions, and three run for re-election or election in a different role.

Beginning from August and part of September, 6GWorld published a series of articles unveiling facts and statistics about past ITU elections and a profile of candidates for Secretary-General and other positions. As at Monday this week, Doreen Bogdan-Martin, from the United States, and Rashid Ismailov, from Russia, were the only two people running for Secretary-General thus reactivating the old rivalry between Russia and America. Delegates are likely to vote along these lines.

The Plenipotentiary Conference began on September 26, but the election will only kick off on September 29. The doors will be closed, and member states will place their ballots in the following order: Secretary-General, Deputy Secretary-General, Directors of the Bureau, the Radio Regulations Board Membership, and the Council.

For the officials, the candidates with the majority of the votes – more than half the delegations present and voting – will be elected.

If no candidate gets majority votes a new round will be held with an interval of at least six hours. If no candidate achieves more than half the votes after three rounds, a fourth and final round between the two candidates with the most votes is held after at least 12 hours. In case of a tie, the eldest gets elected.

For Radio Regulations Board members, there will be one round followed by a special ballot after at least six hours if there is a tie between candidates of the same region. In the case of another tie, the eldest is chosen. The same procedure applies to council members, except for the tiebreaker: instead of age, candidates are elected by lot.

Worried about how to grapple with the trends and what the future holds, ITU is likely to accommodate the tension being brewed by China and Russia on the future of the internet.

This tension has been on over the internet policy since 2012 when ITU hosted the  World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) during which majority of the 193 member nations voted to, among other things, increase ITU’s authority over the internet, but the United States  declined to sign the resulting treaty. And in June 2021, the leaders of China and Russia signed a  pact which is likely to guide deliberations at the ITU plenipotentiary this year.

The agreement explained its purpose as “ensuring that all States have equal rights to participate in global-network governance, increasing their role in this process and preserving the sovereign right of States to regulate the national segment of the internet.” 

Analysts and watchers of the event say although “it appears a lofty creativity in language but its effect is believed to be uncomfortable as calls for nation-states to take over internet governance is a call to democratize the world’s most important network, the internet.”

These analysts reason that as if politicizing the internet is not sufficient, the Russians and Chinese also seek to force the redesign of the internet’s underlying standard. 

As things are today, the internet is built on the lingua franca of a common technical standard called “internet protocol” or “IP.” 

But China has proposed a new standard which it calls new Internet Protocol (IP) that would give governments more control over internet activities, including the individualized determination of who gets on and what they can do. They want that standard to be driven by the ITU.

These and many other issues will dominate discussions as 193 voting member nations deliberate in Bucharest, Romania.

 The elections through secret ballot will determine who will spearhead the expected new technology that will transform the way we communicate and how businesses will run in future.

   Delegates at the quadrennial conference include government ministers and officials, representatives from national, regional, and international bodies, academic institutions, and the private sector –companies dealing with telecommunications and the Internet – reflecting an aspect of ITU’s membership mix that is unique in the UN system. 

United Nations (UN) Secretary-General António Guterres highlighted “the opportunity to form common positions that will shape global digital transformation for years to come” and urged delegates to “seize the opportunities of digital technology while protecting against its risks.” 

In a pre-recorded video message broadcast to delegates, Guterres called on the high-level audience from government and industry “to put humanity’s progress at the centre of your discussions” over the next three weeks. 

A worried UN Chief, lamented that digital networks and technologies have empowered billions of people worldwide, facilitating business, education, government services, trade, and social interactions through the toughest phases of COVID-19. Yet Internet uptake has slowed over the past year, leaving 2.7 billion people – or one-third of the world’s population – unconnected. 

“We are in the middle of a digital revolution that enables and provides the means for the development of new industries and converged services, such as smart vehicles, healthcare, smart cities, and homes,” said Romania’s Vice Prime Minister Sorin Grindeanu in his opening speech. 

“At this turning point in technological development, we must not forget our essential duty to respect the human being,” he added, stressing the need “to protect the freedom and prosperity of future generations, in whose lives the technologies we see today as emerging will play a determining role.”

Aragba-Akpore is a member of THISDAY Editorial Board


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